Wuxiapedia / Authors / Gu Long

Gu Long

Last update: Tuesday 13 June 2006

小李飞刀成绝响,
人世不见楚留香!

The flying dagger of Little Li has become a lost art,
The human world has lost sight of Chu Liuxiang!

A reader's comment:

  • "Wonderfully detailed. Lots of the interesting facts I [didn't] know. I [have always been] confused by the great number of Gu Long works. These articles explain a lot [about them]. [I] really recommend everyone to take a look." - chowbeng, spcnet.tv/forums

gulong

He was a peerless man of superior achievements.

He was a lonely wanderer.

He could hold a sword up on the highest peak and utter a long loud cry, yet he could burst into passionate song and drink to his heart's content ... until he lay drunk in a desolate rural inn amongst old uncouth country-side men.

He had countless bosom buddies and good friends, as well as many beautiful women who knew him well, yet deep in his heart, after a lifetime of unyielding self-satisfaction and freedom, all he had left was loneliness.

Among his famous last words were those that drily described his perception of life: "Relying on a pen, I obtained everything. I even received something that I should not have, and that was loneliness."

Gu Long has passed away, but as (fellow author) Ni Kuang puts it, "There is no Gu Long in the human world, but Gu Long lives on in our hearts!"

The Life of Gu Long

Gu Long (古龙), whose real name was Xiong Yaohua (熊耀华), was a native of Jiangxi, China. As a young man, he enjoyed reading ancient and modern wuxia fiction, as well as Western literary works. He appeared to be most influenced by authors like Yoshikawa Eiji (吉川英治), Ernest Hemmingway, Jack London and John Steinbeck, as well as philosophers like Friedrich Nietzsche. He liked, in his own words, "'stealing moves' from modern Japanese and Western novels", coming with something fresh again and again, until he eventually opened up new frontiers in wuxia fiction.

A Chronological List of Gu Long's Works

Gu Long wrote 66 wuxia novels. Some of these comprised two shorter stories or more, hence bringing the total to 69 separate works. Here is a chronological list of his writing, with notes, links to translated texts and excerpts, as well as corresponding motion picture and made-for-television adaptations.

The Early Years: 1960 to 1963

* A Wuxiapedia Pictorial Special * on Gu Long's early wuxia novels -- 13 works that captured readers with bizarre plots -- featuring book covers, posters of movie adaptations and box-set covers from serialised television adaptations.

Growth: 1964 to 1966

* A Wuxiapedia Pictorial Special * on Gu Long's period of growth in wuxia-writing between 1964 and 1966, featuring book covers, posters of movie adaptations and box-set covers from serialised television adaptations.

Prosperity: 1967 to 1975

* A Wuxiapedia Pictorial Special * on twenty-one novels that pushed Gu Long into the upper echelons of wuxia-writing, featuring book covers, posters of movie adaptations and box-set covers from serialised television adaptations.

To be continued...

Making Sense of the Flying Dagger Series

There was a period of about a decade, between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s, when Gu Long wrote a number of separate but inter-connected novels that featured the well-known Flying Dagger of Little Li. Since the time-line featured in the stories is different from the chronological order in which they were written, readers often wonder when and how they should begin reading these works. Here is a guide...